Calendar of Events

 Between the World and Me Announcement Header

Calendar of Events

(This Calendar of Events will be updated with details for new events as they are confirmed. Please view the event details below for more information about each event.)

Programs Connected to Between the World and Me

RACE: Are we so different? Exhibit (April 22 – October 22)

Saturday, April 22 – Sunday, October 22, 2017 | 10:00am – 5:00pm | North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences

Hosted by the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.

What does the word “race” mean to you? This exhibition looks at race through the lens of science, history, and personal experiences to promote a better understanding of human variation. Interactive exhibit components, historical artifacts, iconic objects, compelling photographs, multimedia presentations, and attractive graphic displays offer visitors to RACE an eye-opening look at its important subject matter. RACE tells the stories of race from the biological, cultural, and historical points of view offering an unprecedented look at race and racism in the United States.

“RACE: Are We So Different?” is a project of American Anthropological Association, with funding from Ford Foundation and National Science Foundation.

Click on the links for more information about the RACE: Are We So Different? exhibit and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences.

Please Note: This exhibit is not affiliated with NC State University or the Common Reading Program. Admission is free but tickets are required. Museum hours are 10:00am-5:00pm, Monday through Saturday, and 12:00pm-5:00pm on Sundays.

CONVOCATION featuring dr. rupert nacoste (AUGUST 14)

Monday, August 14 | 3:00-4:15pm | Reynolds Coliseum

Join the Class of 2021 and the NC State community as Dr. Rupert Nacoste, NC State professor of Psychology, will kick off your time at NC State and welcome you to the Wolfpack during the opening ceremony of the academic year. With a focus on welcoming the newest members of our community, themes from the 2017 Common Reading selection, Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates, will feature prominently in Dr. Nacoste’s address.

This event is open to members of the NC State community.

To learn more about Convocation, click here.

4:44 Listening Party/Black Masculinity (August 29)

Tuesday, August 29 | 2:00 – 4:00 pm | Talley Student Union, Room 5210 (Womens’ Center)

Join the Women’s Center and their campus partners, Black Male Initiative and African American Cultural Center, for a listening party of the latest Jay-Z album, 4:44. After the listening party stay awhile for a critical conversation on the politics of Black masculinity as situated in 4:44 and the album footnotes.

Learn more by clicking here.

Please Note: This program is sponsored and facilitated by the Women’s Center, the Black Male Initiative and the African American Cultural Center.

The african american cultural festival (September 2 & 3)

Saturday, September 2 – Sunday, September 3 | 1:00 – 10:00pm | Downtown Raleigh

The African American Cultural Festival of Raleigh and Wake County is an annual celebration of African American culture as expressed through art, music, food and community. Over the past seven Labor Day weekends, the two day festival has connected diverse people and families from across our region with local, national, and international artists, performers, food vendors, area business owners, and our local media outlets.

The festival has become Raleigh’s premiere destination for teaching, sharing, and celebrating the distinctive folk and cultural traditions of African Americans here in North Carolina and from around the world.

Click on the links for more information about the African American Cultural Festival and for frequently asked questions.

Please Note: The African American Cultural Festival is not affiliated with NC State University or the Common Reading Program.

Campus Life in the Age of Between the World and Me (September 7)

Thursday, September 7 | 7:00 – 8:00pm | James B. Hunt Jr. Library, Room 4505 (Teaching and Visualization Lab)

In conjunction with the NC State’s Common Reading of Ta-Nahesi Coates’ Between the World and Me, the NCSU Libraries and NC State’s Black Alumni Society co-present a panel discussion about the issues and experiences of college students, particularly African-American students. Featuring Dr. Blair Kelley (NC State), Dr. Mark Anthony Neal (Duke University), Dr. Yaba Blay (North Carolina Central University), and Professor Natalie Bullock Brown (St. Augustine’s University).

The NCSU Libraries Special Collections Research Center will bring a show and tell of items highlighting African American student life at NC State to view outside of the Teaching & Visualization Lab before the program, from 6:30-7:00pm.

Please Note: This program is sponsored and facilitated by the NC State Libraries and NC State’s Black Alumni Society and is funded, in part, by the Common Reading Mini-Grant program.

Sponsored Trip: “Race: Are we so different?” (September 10)

Sunday, September 10 | 1:30 – 5:00pm | North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences

RACE: Are We So Different? is a dynamic museum exhibit housed at the NC Museum of Natural Science. University Housing Living and Learning Villages are collaborating to engage students in an experience to explore, enlighten and challenge thoughts, assumptions and perceptions of RACE. Organizers also seek to engage in productive dialogue on how and what we as a community can do to ensure NC State is a welcoming and inclusive community for all. In particular, organizers want to leave this experience with actionable items Villages and students can do to educate the community.

After a tour of the exhibit, there will be REFRESHMENTS and a debrief in Talley student center. Transportation will be provided to and from the exhibit on Sunday, September 10, 2017. You will receive more information about transportation after registering for the event.

For more information and to register for this event, visit the online registration form. Registration is capped at 100 students.

Priority registration is available to Living and Learning Village students until Wednesday, September 6 at 12:00pm. After 12:00pm on September 6, first-year students not affiliated with a Village are able to register for the remaining available spots.

Please note: This program is sponsored by University Housing’s Living and Learning Villages and is funded, in part, by the Common Reading Mini-Grant program.

Internalized oppression (October 2)

Monday, October 2 | 3:00 – 5:00pm | Talley Student Union, Room 3222

Internalized oppression refers to the ways that individuals unconsciously learn, accept, and reinforce ideas and attitudes that perpetuate inequity and oppression. This includes learned attitudes and actions related to internalized dominance and internalized subordination. This two-hour workshop is open to NC State undergraduates, graduate students, staff, faculty and alumni as well as interested members of the local community. The workshop will help participants learn to recognize the everyday, unchallenged assumptions we all make, to understand the impact of our assumptions on our own and others’ lived experiences, and to increase our ability to interrupt these dominant narratives that serve to perpetuate inequity and oppression.

To learn more about the workshop, click here, or to register for the Internalized Oppression workshop, visit http://oied.ncsu.edu/glbt/glbt-advocates-program/.

Please Note: This program is sponsored and facilitated by the GLBT Center.

“moonlight” film screening & discussion (october 19)

Thursday, October 18 | 6:00 – 8:30pm | Witherspoon Student Center, Room 126

The film “Moonlight” received critical acclaim for its intimate portrayal of the lived experiences of the main character as he explored his identity at the intersections of race, sexuality, gender, and class. Join the GLBT Center and the African-American Cultural Center as we view the film, and discuss the representation of Black, queer masculinity in film, media, and our cultural consciousness.

Please Note: This program is sponsored and facilitated by the African American Cultural Center and the GLBT Center.

Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls (November 17)

Friday, November 17 | 2:00 – 3:30pm | Poe Hall, Room 512

In collaboration with the Women’s Center and the College of Education’s Education Awareness Week, the GLBT Center will host a discussion of the book Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools by Monique Morris. This text is a call to action around the inequalities of Black girls within K-12 education and describes the school-to-confinement pipeline – the high risk situations which affect the life trajectory of Black girls after being pushed out of school, setting them on the path to incarceration as well as physical and economic insecurity. GLBT and Women’s Center staff and graduate students will provide an overview of the book and facilitate a discussion of what needs to change in the education system.

This event is sponsored by the the College of Education, the GLBT Center, and the Women’s Center and is a part of Transgender Awareness Week programming.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click here to view programs related to Just Mercy, the 2016 common reading (2016-2017)
Pre-Convocation Book Signing with Bryan Stevenson (August 15)

Monday, August 15 | 2:00-2:50pm | PNC Arena

Bryan Stevenson, author of Just Mercy, will sign books for students, faculty, and staff prior to his Convocation Address (see below). Those wishing to have their books signed should plan on arriving early at PNC Arena.

Students should consult the Wolfpack Welcome Week schedule for information on bus transportation to PNC Arena.

Convocation Address by Bryan Stevenson (August 15)

Monday, August 15 | 3:00-4:15pm | PNC Arena

Join the Class of 2020 and the NC State community as Bryan Stevenson, author of Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption, speaks about his book and the issues surrounding racial and social class inequities, the criminal justice system, and the need to look closer to understand the experiences of others.

This event is open to members of the NC State community.

Students should consult the Wolfpack Welcome Week schedule for information on bus transportation to PNC Arena.

Processing Just Mercy: Round Table Conversations with Faculty & Staff (August 19)

Friday, August 19 | 11:45am-1:15pm | Carmichael Recreation Complex, Playzone

Have you read NC State’s 2016 Common Reading, Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson? Do you want to discuss with other faculty and staff how to facilitate conversations about the challenging topics presented within this book? In this session you will discuss, in small group round tables with other faculty and staff, the book itself as well as strategies for facilitating student discussion in your classroom. Seasoned discussion leaders will guide table conversations. A buffet lunch from Moe’s Southwest Grill will be provided.

To register please visit: https://ofd.ncsu.edu/event/processing-just-mercy/

Sponsored by the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, the Division of Academic and Student Affairs, the Office for Institutional Equity and Diversity, and the Office of Faculty Development Friday, August 19.
A Community Discussion of Just Mercy (August 24 & September 14)

Multiple Dates (See Below) | 7:00-8:00pm | Quail Ridge Bookstore

Common Reading partner, Quail Ridge Bookstore (QRB) will host multiple discussions of Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption by Bryan Stevenson. This is the common read for incoming first-year students at NC State University, Duke University, East Carolina University, and Elon University. Parents, students and community members interested are invited to join QRB bookseller Kent Bryant for a three meeting book club to discuss this provocative book.

The discussions are scheduled for August 10, August 24, and September 14 (all dates are Wednesdays) and will be held at the Quail Ridge Bookstore in North Hills, located at 4209-100 Lassiter Mill Rd, Raleigh NC 27609. For more information, please visit the Just Mercy Book Club webpage.

To help estimate attendance, please RSVP to Kent Bryant (kent@quailridgebooks.com) if you plan to attend one or more of the meetings.

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Black Man With a Horn Gallery Exhibit (August 17 – September 30)

Wednesday, August 17 – Friday, Septmber 30 | 9:00am-5:00pm | Witherspoon Student Center, African American Cultural Center Art Gallery (2nd Floor)

On display from Wednesday, August 17 through Friday, September 30, local artist Antoine Williams will show “Black Man With a Horn”; a site-specific installation of semi-autobiographical narratives consisting of life-size figures made from wheat-paste and found objects. These distorted figures serve as metaphor for larger systemic issues of a broken criminal justice system that rest at the intersection of class, race, geography, and semiotics. Essentially, this show will reflect the specifics of Black life in the southeast United States with echoes of contemporary issues we face as a nation.

Please note: The African American Cultural Center Art Gallery is open Monday through Friday from 9:00am to 5:00pm.

For more information on the artist, please visit www.rawgoods.org.

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Host a Class in the Art Gallery (September 5 – 30)

Monday, September 5 – Friday, September 30 | Witherspoon Student Center, African American Cultural Center Art Gallery (2nd Floor)

The African American Cultural Center invites faculty to hold their class sessions on the Common Read, Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption, in the art gallery between Monday, September 5 and Friday, September 30. During this week, the gallery will host “Black Man With a Horn”; a site-specific installation of semi-autobiographical narratives consisting of life-size figures, which serve as metaphor for larger systemic issues of a broken criminal justice system that rest at the intersection of class, race, geography, and semiotics. Essentially, this show will reflect the specifics of Black life in the southeast United States with echoes of contemporary issues we face as a nation.

Faculty can register by to hold their class in the art gallery at go.ncsu.edu/AACCgalleryclass916, by Friday, September 23, 2016. Please contact Dawn Morgan, Assistant Director with any questions at dmmorga2@ncsu.edu.

For more information on the artist, please visit www.rawgoods.org

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Selma: Film Screening (September 2)

Friday, September 2 | 6:00-8:30pm | North Carolina Museum of History

Learn some of the exhibit’s context with the movie Selma. The historical drama, featuring David Oyelowo as Martin Luther King Jr., depicts the marches from Selma, Alabama, to the state capital in Montgomery during the African American struggle to gain voting rights. Michelle Lanier, director of the North Carolina African American Heritage Commission, will talk about the film’s facts and flaws beforehand; afterward, Thomas Easley, a descendant of one of the march’s organizers, will discuss his family’s role in the march.

Cosponsored with the North Carolina African American Heritage Commission. For more information, please click here.

Please Note: This program is not affiliated with NC State University or the Common Reading Program.

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Selma to Montgomery: A March for the Right to Vote (September 3, 2016 – March 5, 2017)

Saturday, September 3, 2016 – Saturday, March 5, 2017 | 9:00am-5:00pm | North Carolina Museum of History

Hosted by the North Carolina Museum of History, this exhibit looks at the march from Selma to Montgomery through the lens of photographer Spider Martin.

This photography exhibit focuses on the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. It was part of the campaign for African American voting rights, equality and social justice. Marches and rallies resulted in the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which was signed into law on August 6.

Selma to Montgomery is curated and circulated by the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute. The exhibition is made possible, in part, by the City of Birmingham and contributions to the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute’s Corporate Campaign.

Click on the links for more information about the Selma to Montgomery: A March for the Right to Vote exhibit and the North Carolina Museum of History.

Please Note: This exhibit is not affiliated with NC State University or the Common Reading Program. Museum hours are 9:00am-5:00pm, Monday through Saturday, and 12:00pm-5:00pm on Sundays.

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An Evening with Martin and Langston, Starring Danny Glover and Felix Justice (September 16)

Friday, September 16 | 8:00-9:30pm | Talley Student Union, Stewart Theatre (3rd Floor)

An Evening with Martin and Langston, starring renowned actors Danny Glover and Felix Justice, draws audiences inside the worlds of two of the greatest orators of the 20th century: Martin Luther King, Jr. and Langston Hughes. Join NC State partners for this special performance and as the university kicks off Experiencing King at NC State, a weekend of events created to showcase NC State’s civil rights-related digital humanities projects.

The evening begins with Justice’s critically acclaimed portrayal of Dr. King; through the words of his most memorable speeches, Justice transforms into the legendary civil-rights leader, recreating the power of the man and his message. He then introduces “an old friend of mine I think you may have heard of,” and Glover enters the stage to bring to life the words and poetry of Langston Hughes, portraying one of the great American writers in modern history.

The evening will conclude with an audience discussion with these acclaimed actors, examining the importance of the arts in education and the intersections of art, culture and activism. This event has been created through a partnership with the NCSU Libraries, the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, the African American Cultural Center, and NC State LIVE.

Tickets

Tickets are available onlineat Ticket Central, or by phone, 919.515.1100. Prices range from $35-$40; NC State student tickets cost $8.75.

Pre-show Talk

Arrive early for a pre-show talk by NC State English professor Jason Miller, author of Origins of the Dream: Hughes’s Poetry and King’s Rhetoric. The talk will take place at 7 p.m. in Talley Student Union’s Coastal Ballroom.
For more information, visit the College of Humanities & Social Sciences by clicking here.

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African American Cultural Center Art Gallery Workshop (September 17)

Saturday, September 17 | 10:00am-12:00pm | Witherspoon Student Center, African American Cultural Center Art Gallery (2nd Floor)

Join the African American Cultural Center for a workshop with artist antoine williams, creator of the AACC gallery’s current exhbit “Black Man With a Horn”, as he prompts attendees to create a self-portrait based on our reflection and examination of the media’s representation of society. This workshop will take place on Saturday, September 17th from 10am-noon, in the AACC Gallery on the 2nd floor of Witherspoon.

Register for this workshop by clicking here.

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Experiencing King at NC State (September 17)

Saturday, September 17 | 10:00am-4:00pm | James B. Hunt Jr. Library

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. made a measurable impact on our state’s and our nation’s struggle for civil rights. Experience King from new angles through this series of immersive events showcasing NC State’s civil rights-related digital humanities projects.

Events include:

All events are free and open to the public. Sponsored by the College of Humanities & Social Sciences.

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Why Prison Is Personal and Political: Miea’s Story (September 19)

Monday, September 19 | 4:30-5:30pm | Talley Student Union, Room 4140 (4th Floor)

A recent report from the Vera Institute of Justice notes that “despite recent calls to reform the criminal justice system in light of increasing numbers of incarcerated people, one trend has received little attention: the dramatic rise in the number of women being held in local jails. Since 1970, the number of women in jail nationwide has increased 14-fold—from under 8,000 to nearly 110,000—and now accounts for approximately half of all women behind bars in the United States.” As Bryan Stevenson, class of 2020 convocation speaker and author of Just Mercy noted, “We are living in a country where we need more mercy, where we need more hope, where we need more justice.”  Join the NC State Women’s Center & Social Work Department as we continue the charge to change the world and:

  • Hear one fellow Wolfpack member’s story
  • Learn more about the impact of prison systems on women and change the narrative
  • Stay hopeful & do uncomfortable things as we learn to #ThinkandDo through local opportunities.

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Bearing Witness to Injustice (September 21)

Wednesday, September 21 | 7:00-8:30pm | Talley Student Union, Mountains Ballroom (3rd Floor)

Join Mandy Locke, an award-winning investigative reporter for the News & Observer, as she speaks to the importance of bearing witness to injustices in our society. While making her name reporting on the criminal justice system, Ms. Locke discusses her moral responsibility to report on injustices in the criminal justice system. From the use of deadly force by law enforcement officials to the abuse of labor laws, Ms. Locke recounts her experiences reporting on instances of injustice in our society. This presentation will include components of Ms. Locke’s Deadly Force series.

This event is open to members of the NC State community and members of the general public.

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Raising Bertie: Film Screening & Discussion (October 11)

Tuesday, October 11 | 7:30-9:30pm | Talley Student Union, Mountains Ballroom (3rd Floor)

Join us for a screening of the documentary film, Raising Bertie, which follows the experiences of three African American adolescents in Bertie County. Set in Bertie County, a rural African American-led community in Eastern North Carolina, Raising Bertie takes audiences deep into the emotional lives of three boys over six-years as they come of age. This powerful vérité film weaves the young men’s stories together as they try to define their identities; they navigate unemployment, institutional racism, violence, first love, fatherhood, and estrangement from family members and mentors.

This event will include a screening of the film and a Question and Answer session with the fillmmakers.

This event is open to members of the NC State community and members of the general public.

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Shaka Senghor: Writing My Wrongs  (October 19)

Wednesday, October 19 | 6:00-8:00pm | Talley Student Union, Coastal Ballroom (3rd Floor)

After serving nineteen years in the Michigan Department of Corrections, including more than five years in solitary confinement, Shaka shares his experiences with the inner workings of prison and the politics that play out on the state level and inside the prison walls. Based upon his experiences in the prison system, there are two things he knows for sure: 1) prisons are a business and 2) prisons do not rehabilitate. Come out to hear his story of overcoming seemingly impossible odds and breaking out of self-imposed prisons. His remarkable story will leave an indelible mark and showcase the human costs of solitary confinement.

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Cruel & Unusual: Film Screening & Discussion (November 14)

Monday, November 14 | 7:00-9:00pm | Talley Student Union, Room 4280 (4th Floor)

Join the GLBT Center for the second annual Transgender Awareness Week. This week kicks off with the screening of the film “Cruel and Unusual” that depicts the experiences of transgender women forced to serve their sentence in men’s prisons. This film contains graphic descriptions of sexual violence and self-harm and brief nudity. A discussion of the film will follow.

This event is open to members of the NC State community and members of the general public.

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Mental Illness within the Criminal Justice System (November 16)

Wednesday, November 16 | 6:30-8:00pm | Dabney Hall, Room 221

The Park Scholarships Social Justice Speaker Series is hosting a student-organized panel on Mental Illness within the Criminal Justice System. Join them to hear from three fantastic speakers from around North Carolina who have experience working in this field:
• Michele Luecking-Sunman, Civil Litigation Managing Attorney
• Jennifer Blue, lawyer at NC Prisoner Legal Services
• Sarah L. Desmarais, Associate Professor and Coordinator of the Applied Social and Community Psychology Program
They will be sharing insight on the many issues, solutions, and ethical concerns surrounding this topic.

 

From Awareness to Activism Series: Unlawfully Incarcerated: A Panel Discussion with Survivors of Unjust Incarceration (February 2)

Thursday, February 2 | 5:00-7:30pm | Witherspoon Student Center, Room 201

A series of lectures and panel discussions “From Awareness to Activism” continues the discourse around topics related to this year’s common reading “Just Mercy.” This panel will focus on the impact of unlawful incarceration on the community.

Social justice begins with an awareness of the injustices that plague our society. This event will focus on victims of racial injustice in North Carolina. The individuals participating in this panel, and their narratives, will allow putting a face and a voice to the unlawfully accused. Contact Genia Glute at gsklute@ncsu.edu for more information.

This event is sponsored by University Honors Program and the Department of Communication and is a part of Black History Month programming.

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The Drug War: A Gateway to Mass Incarceration (February 8)

Wednesday, February 8 |  4:00 – 6:00 PM | Witherspoon Student Center, Campus Cinema

Retired police officer Raeford Davis will speak to students about how his experiences have shaped his belief that the drug war is a drag on society, especially for non-white communities. Contact Zac Lentz at zalentz@ncsu.edu for more information.

This event is sponsored by NCSU Student Chapter of NORML, Collegiate Recovery Community, and Alcohol and Other Drugs (AOD) and is a part of Black History Month programming.

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Building resiliency: Healing responses to the traumas of oppression (February 8)

Wednesday, February 8 |  6:00 – 7:30 PM | Witherspoon Student Center

The program will provide a forum to discuss resiliency and healing in the Black community from a historical to present day focus – will discuss impact of identity trauma, trauma theories, and clinical resources to promote healing and wellness in the current sociopolitical climate. Contact Stephanie Rubain at slrubain@ncsu.edu for more information.

This event is sponsored by the NC State Counseling Center Staff and is a part of Black History Month programming.

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What is Racial Justice? (February 9)

Thursday, February 9 |  9:00 – 11:00 AM | Talley Student Union, Room 4101

This two-hour workshop is open to NC State undergraduates, graduate students, staff, faculty and alumni as well as interested members of the local community. The workshop will help participants contextualize these conversations within our specific history of race relations, understand the ways racism operates (interpersonally, culturally, institutionally), and reflect on the ways each of us can and must play a role in creating cultural change. Contact the GLBT Center at glbtcenter@ncsu.edufor more information.

This event is sponsored by GLBT Center and is a part of Black History Month programming.

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From Awareness to Activism Series: Innocence Commission Panel (February 9)

Thursday, February 9 |  6:00 – 7:30 PM | SAS Hall, Room 2203

The NC Innocence Inquiry Commission is a state agency that was established in August 2006 by the General Assembly to investigate and evaluate post-conviction claims of factual innocence.
The members include a Superior Court Judge, a Prosecuting Attorney, a Defense Attorney, a Victim Advocate, a Member of the Public, a Sheriff, and two Discretionary Members. This panel will discuss the work done by the Innocence Commission. Facilitator: Darrell Stover Contact Genia Sklute at gsklute@ncsu.edu for more information.

This event is sponsored by University Honors Program; Co-sponsored by Interdisciplinary Studies in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences and a part of Black History Month programming.

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From Awareness to Activism Series: Lynching: Remembering Our History (February 16)

Thursday, February 16 | 12:00 – 1:00 PM | Honors Village Commons, Room TBD

A series of lectures and panel discussions “From Awareness to Activism” continues the discourse around topics related to this year’s common reading “Just Mercy.”
In this lecture, Dr. Blair Kelley will focus on the history of lynching in the United States. Contact Genia Sklute at gsklute@ncsu.edu for more information.

This event is sponsored by the University Honors Program; Co-sponsored by Interdisciplinary Studies in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences and a part of Black History Month programming.

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On the Sociolinguistic Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.: Analysis and Implications for Social Justice (February 16)

Thursday, February 16 | 5:00 PM | Talley Student Union, Room 3210

Although the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s eloquence as a speaker is widely recognized and his rhetorical strategies have been extensively studied, no previous study has examined King’s dialect, and how his language varies in different settings. This talk examines the ways in which King’s speech represents his identity as a Southerner, African American, and preacher as he adapts to different audiences and contexts. Four famous speech events will be examined closely: the “I Have a Dream” speech (1963), his Nobel Prize acceptance speech (1964), a conversation with talk-show host Merv Griffin (1967), and the “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” speech (1968).

Audience members will gain an understanding of King’s linguistic variation across different contexts, as well as implications for modern day social justice.

Free and open to the public. Lecture presented by William C. Friday Distinguished Professor Dr. Walt Wolfram, and Ph.D. students in Sociology (sociolinguistics concentration) Caroline Myrick, Jon Forrest, and Michael J. Fox.

Contact Jessica Hatcher jmhatch2@ncsu.edu for additional information.

This event is sponsored by the Language Diversity Ambassadors at NC State and is a part of Black History Month programming.

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From Awareness to Activism Series: Activism in Wake County and Beyond (February 21)

Tuesday, February 21 | 6:00pm-7:30pm | Park Shops, Room 210

A series of lectures and panel discussions “From Awareness to Activism” continues the discourse around topics related to this year’s common reading “Just Mercy.” This panel will focus on the impact of unlawful incarceration on the community.

The Research Triangle and surrounding areas have a diverse group of young social activists working to facilitate change in the society. The activism panel will consist of young activists in the area. These activists will talk about their platform, work and commitment to social change, and help students and the community gain a better understanding of how they can become agents of change in their communities. Facilitator: Dr. Thomas Easley. Contact Genia Sklute at gsklute@ncsu.edu for more information.

This event is sponsored by University Honors Program; Co-sponsored by the College of Natural Resources and is a part of Black History Month programming.

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Institutional Oppression of GLBT Youth in the Juvenile Justice System (February 23)

Thursday, February 23 | 6:30pm-7:30pm | Talley Student Union, Currituck-Hatteras Ballroom

Join the GLBT Center as they host Shaena Johnson, Co-Director of BreakOUT, who will discuss the experiences of GLBT youth with the juvenile justice system, particularly how race, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, sexual orientation and gender identity are factors that increase the likelihood that youth will be funneled into the criminal justice system. The presentation will describe the systemic barriers that exist for these youth as they try to navigate the juvenile justice system and the impact of these barriers on their ability to successfully advocate for themselves. Contact the GLBT Center at (919) 513-9742 for more information.

This event is sponsored by the GLBT Center and is a part of Black History Month programming.

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Civil Rights Tour to Atlanta and Alabama

Friday, March 3 to Sunday, March 5 | Atlanta, Georgia & Montgomery, Alabama

Come join the University Honors Program (UHP) on a Southern Civil Rights Tour to Georgia and Alabama. (THIS TRIP IS OPEN TO ANY NC STATE UNIVERSITY STUDENT) The Civil RIghts Tour to Atlanta and Alabama mirrors the middle of Freedom Rides. The Freedom Riders’ Trip was launched in 1961 by a group of 13 African-American and white civil rights activists. It was a series of bus trips through the American South to protest segregation. This trip drew international attention.

Depart NC State Friday, March 3, 2017 at 8:00 am and return to NC State on Sunday, March 5, 2017 in the evening.

This trip includes:

  • Round trip charter bus accommodations to Atlanta, Georgia, Montgomery and Birmingham, Alabama
  • One night hotel accommodations in Atlanta, Georgia (Buckhead) (Breakfast included)
  • Tour of the Civil and Human Rights Museum in Atlanta, Georgia
  • One night hotel accommodations in Birmingham, Alabama (Breakfast included)
  • Tour of the Equal Justice Initiative with a discussion surrounding their work that addresses race and poverty in America and lynching
  • Tour of the Southern Poverty Law Center and Civil Rights Memorial
  • Walking tour of Kelly Ingram Park o Free evening to tour and explore Atlanta, Georgia (Downtown)

The cost of the trip is $150. This includes all the activities/accommodations listed above. Due date Wednesday, February 15, 2017.

Please direct any questions to UHP Assistant Director, Carolyn Veale at cpveale@ncsu.edu or Administrative Support Associate, Marquette Russell at mrussel@ncsu.edu. Students can register for the trip and submit payment (cash, check or money order) at 219 Clark Hall on Monday-Friday from 8:00 am – 4:30 pm.

Students that are interested in the trip and can demonstrate financial need are eligible to apply for aid that will offset the price of the trip.

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Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty (March 23)

Thursday, March 23 | 7:00-9:00pm | SAS Hall, Room 2203

Come here noted author and speaker, Dorothy Roberts, discuss her work Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of LIberty. Published in 1997, Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty documents a long history of regulation of Black women’s bodies in the United States, beginning with the legal status of enslaved women as property, and explains its crucial importance to both reproductive and racial politics in America. Twenty years later, these devaluing ideologies, laws, and policies have expanded in new guises that help to perpetuate race and gender injustice in the health care, law enforcement, welfare, and foster care systems. At the same time, the rise of an exciting reproductive justice movement has provided a new framework for envisioning a more humane and equitable society.

This event is a part of Women’s Herstory Month programming.

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Talking Black in America: Film Screening & Discussion (April 4)
Tuesday, April 4 | 7:00-9:00pm | Witherspoon Student Center, Room 126 (Washington Sankofa Room)

“Accent discrimination can be found everywhere in our daily lives. In fact, such behavior
is so commonly accepted, so widely perceived as appropriate, that it must be
seen as the last back door to discrimination. And the door is still wide open.”
-Rosina Lippi-Green (1997:73)

Language prejudice, linguistic profiling, and linguistic discrimination are a persistent and pervasive social problem across America — and the criminal justice system is no exception.

Join the Language Diversity Ambassadors for a special screening of Talking Black in America, the newly-released documentary detailing the history and development of the most misunderstood and stigmatized dialect in the nation: African American English. This screening will be followed by a panel discussion and Q&A with linguist Walt Wolfram, legal scholar James Coleman, and capital appeals attorney Vernetta Alston. They’ll discuss the ways language discrimination interacts with other forms of discrimination in the American justice system, as demonstrated in Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson.

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Second Chance Advocacy Day (April 25)

Tuesday, April 25 | 9:30am-2:00pm | North Carolina Legislative Building

Interested in advocating for the rights of the previously incarcerated? The NC Second Chance Alliance is a statewide alliance of advocacy organizations, service providers, faith-based organizations, community leaders and directly-impacted and concerned citizens that has come together to promote polices that remove barriers to productive citizenship for individuals with criminal records.

One of the most important opportunities to voice your support for second chances is the third biannual “Second Chance Lobby Day” which will occur at the North Carolina Legislative Building on Tuesday, April 25, 2017. All North Carolinians who care about this issue are encouraged to attend.

At past events participants have voiced their support for a variety of specific reforms that provide genuine restorative opportunities to individuals ready and willing to move beyond their criminal records and contribute to their families and communities. Each participant will have the opportunity to speak directly with legislators.

For more information, please visit the Second Chance Alliance website by clicking here. A flyer for this event can also be viewed here.

Please Note: This program is not affiliated with NC State University or the Common Reading Program.

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